1. 1-13 of 13
    1. Puerto Rico Moves to Cancel Contract with Whitefish Energy to Repair Electric Grid

      Puerto Rico Moves to Cancel Contract with Whitefish Energy to Repair Electric Grid

      Puerto Rico’s electric company moved Sunday to cancel a $300 million contract with a small Montana firm for repairs to the territory’s hurricane-ravaged electrical grid, saying controversy surrounding the agreement was distracting from the effort to restore power. The contract with Whitefish Energy — a firm that had just two employees the day the storm hit — had drawn blistering criticism from members of Congress for days. And on Friday the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which has a large role in determining government reimbursements, said it had “significant concerns” about how the contract was secured.

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    2. The Energy 202: Tax Debate Opens Door for Renewables to Get Same Break as Fossil Fuels

      The Energy 202: Tax Debate Opens Door for Renewables to Get Same Break as Fossil Fuels

      As solar and wind power make up a small but increasing share of U.S. electricity generation, at least one member of the Trump administration has pointed out that the renewable energy sources are propped up by federal tax subsidies. “I’d let them stand on their own and compete against coal and natural gas and other sources,” Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt said of solar and wind energy this month. Left unmentioned are the several ways in which the U.S. government subsidizes fossil-fuel energy. One of the biggest boons for the oil-and-gas sector is the use of a legal entity called a master limited partnership, or MLP, which allows firms to lighten their tax loads and get easier access to investment in pipelines and other projects.

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      Mentions: U.S. EPA
    3. Small Montana Firm Lands Puerto Rico’s Biggest Contract to Get the Power Back on

      Small Montana Firm Lands Puerto Rico’s Biggest Contract to Get the Power Back on

      For the sprawling effort to restore Puerto Rico’s crippled electrical grid, the territory’s state-owned utility has turned to a two-year-old company from Montana that had just two full-time employees on the day Hurricane Maria made landfall. The company, Whitefish Energy, said last week that it had signed a $300 million contract with the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority to repair and reconstruct large portions of the island’s electrical infrastructure. The contract is the biggest yet issued in the troubled relief effort.

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      Mentions: MT Puerto Rico
    4. Small Montana Firm Lands Puerto Rico’s Biggest Contract to Get the Power Back on

      Small Montana Firm Lands Puerto Rico’s Biggest Contract to Get the Power Back on

      For the sprawling effort to restore Puerto Rico’s crippled electrical grid, the territory’s state-owned utility has turned to a two-year-old company from Montana that had just two full-time employees on the day Hurricane Maria made landfall. The company, Whitefish Energy, said last week that it had signed a $300 million contract with the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority to repair and reconstruct large portions of the island’s electrical infrastructure. The contract is the biggest yet issued in the troubled relief effort.

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      Mentions: MT Puerto Rico
    5. Bipartisan Group of Former FERC Commissioners Rejects Energy Secretary’s Bid to Help Coal Plants

      Bipartisan Group of Former FERC Commissioners Rejects Energy Secretary’s Bid to Help Coal Plants

      Eight former members of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission  — including five former chairmen — have filed a letter with the commission opposing Perry’s proposal that would give coal and nuclear plants credit for resilience so that they would have a better chance of beating solar, wind and natural gas competitors.

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      Mentions: FERC
    6. The Energy 202: Eclipse Tests Growing Power of Renewable Energy

      The Energy 202: Eclipse Tests Growing Power of Renewable Energy

      On Monday, Mother Nature, seemingly unprompted, provided a test of one of the more controversial ideas tossed around by the energy and environmental staff installed by President Trump. Here's their question: Do recent changes to way power is generated in the United States — namely, more solar and wind, less coal and nuclear — mean the nation's grid operators will not have enough power plants to meet electricity needs when the wind isn't blowing or the sun isn't shining?

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      Mentions: U.S.
    7. Trump’s Budget Would Torpedo Obama’s Investments in Climate Change and Clean Energy

      Trump’s Budget Would Torpedo Obama’s Investments in Climate Change and Clean Energy

      From the elimination of major programs to the shifting of scientific priorities, the Trump administration budget proposal unveiled Thursday presents a wholesale repudiation of two main Obama administration objectives: fighting climate change and stoking a revolution in renewable energy.  At the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, $250 million in coastal and ocean grants and programs — many of which help ready communities for rising seas and a warmer, more acidic ocean — would be cut. Satellite programs would be trimmed. The proposed cuts, previously reported on by The Washington Post, have shaken the country’s climate science community and triggered an outcry.

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      Mentions: WA
    8. Trump Victory Reverses U.S. Energy and Environmental Priorities

      Trump Victory Reverses U.S. Energy and Environmental Priorities

      Donald J. Trump comes into office with a plan to toss out most of what President Obama achieved on energy and the environment. While vowing to “cancel” the international Paris climate accord Obama championed, Trump would also rearrange domestic energy and environmental priorities. He wants to open up federal lands to oil and gas drilling and coal mining. He wants to eliminate regulations he calls needless. He would scrap proposed regulations for tighter methane controls on domestic drillers. And he wants to shrink the role of the Environmental Protection Agency to a mostly advisory one and pull back the Clean Power Plan, Obama’s proposed plan to push utilities toward lower carbon emissions.

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      Mentions: U.S. EPA
    9. Can Progress on Climate Change Keep Up With its Quickening Pace?

      Can Progress on Climate Change Keep Up With its Quickening Pace?

      July was the hottest month in recorded history, by a lot, and August isn’t looking any better.  So how do we interpret that? What does it mean? I’m no scientist. In my 30 years as a businessperson, though, I’ve learned that the best decisions require looking at all of the available data and trends. You seldom have the complete analysis that a scientist would require — events unfold quickly. Instead, business people often must make decisions on the basis of imperfect information. A responsible chief executive knows two things: that a decision not to act is a decision, and that no competent leader risks the health of the entire enterprise by failing to take necessary steps, even ones that are painful.

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    10. Clean Energy is Winning the Race Against Fossil Fuels — but the Planet is Still Losing

      Clean Energy is Winning the Race Against Fossil Fuels — but the Planet is Still Losing

      A new United Nations report has found that 2015 set a slew of new records for global investment in clean energy — and furthermore, the bulk of investment was not in places like the United States or Germany but rather in the developing world. But the report also contained a grim punchline when it came to the impact this is having on the broader climate change problem. The world invested an unprecedented $286 billion in clean energy in 2015, the report found — and with that money purchased a similarly unrivaled 118 gigawatts (or billion watts) of new wind and solar photovoltaic electricity generating capacity, among other installments. More than half of all new generating capacity in 2015 was in renewables, another new record.

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      Mentions: India U.S. Brazil
    11. Huge Deal Provides the Latest Evidence that the Battery Business has Arrived

      Huge Deal Provides the Latest Evidence that the Battery Business has Arrived

      At the Paris climate change conference earlier this month, all eyes were on some massive announcements in the solar and wind energy space — including plans in Africa to install 300 gigawatts of renewable energy capacity across the continent by the year 2030. A gigawatt is a billion watts — and this would be nearly double the electricity capacity that the continent currently supports. Less noticed, however, is that a key enabling technology for solar — and for the future of clean energy — is also starting to grow: Energy storage.

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    12. This Could be the Biggest Sign Yet that the Battery Revolution is Here

      This Could be the Biggest Sign Yet that the Battery Revolution is Here

      We may be getting a real time glimpse of a world that energy visionaries have long awaited — one featuring a large scale merger between clean energy technologies, like wind and solar, and large batteries that can store power from these sources and make it available at will.

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    1-13 of 13
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