1. Articles from theguardian.com

  2. 1-13 of 13
    1. California’s Big Battery Experiment: a Turning Point for Energy Storage?

      California’s Big Battery Experiment: a Turning Point for Energy Storage?

      On a paved expanse next to an electrical substation in Escondido, 30 miles north of downtown San Diego, sits a row of huge silver boxes. The site resembles a barracks, but instead of soldiers, the 24 containers house racks of battery packs. This is the largest lithium-ion battery in the world, according to its developers. When the local grid needs more power, these batteries deliver, almost instantaneously. They hold up to 30 megawatts fully charged – roughly equivalent to powering 20,000 homes – and can sustain that level for up to four hours.

      Read Full Article
    2. UK to Fund Research into Letting Electric Cars Return Power to Grid

      UK to Fund Research into Letting Electric Cars Return Power to Grid

      The UK plans to invest millions of pounds to explore how the batteries in thousands of electric cars could help the power grid and drive take-up of the cleaner vehicles. British businesses will be able to bid for £20m of government funding for undertaking research and trials of vehicle-to-grid technology, which officials believe holds “enormous potential” benefits for drivers and the energy system.

      Read Full Article
      Mentions: UK
    3. Energy storage vital to keep UK lights on, say MPs

      Energy storage vital to keep UK lights on, say MPs

      Large-scale batteries to store energy and devices that switch themselves off are likely to be key technologies for keeping the UK’s lights on while shutting down old coal and nuclear plants, an influential committee of MPs has said. The threat of blackouts has receded for this winter after scares earlier in the year, National Grid said on Friday, citing a reprieve for Yorkshire’s Eggborough coal-fired power station, as well as greater flexibility from companies with big energy requirements.

      Read Full Article
      Mentions: Europe Russia UK
    4. 'Nano-machines' win European trio chemistry Nobel prize

      'Nano-machines' win European trio chemistry Nobel prize

      A European trio of chemists have won the Nobel prize in chemistry for developing “nano-machines”, an advance that paved the way for the world’s first smart materials. Sir Fraser Stoddart, from Scotland, Bernard Feringa, from the Netherlands, and Jean-Pierre Sauvage, from France, will share the 8m Swedish kronor (£718,000) prize announced by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm today.

      Read Full Article
    5. Puerto Rico Battles Massive Blackout After Fire at Electricity Plant

      Puerto Rico Battles Massive Blackout After Fire at Electricity Plant

      A massive blackout has hit Puerto Rico after a fire broke out at one of the island’s main electricity plants, leaving almost half of the US territory’s 3.5 million inhabitants without power. The Electric Power Authority said two transmission lines of 230,000 volts each failed, for reasons which are still being investigated. Puerto Rico’s governor Alejandro Garcia Padilla said in a press conference that it could be as much as 24 hours before power is restored, according to newspaper El Nuovo Dia.

      Read Full Article
      Mentions: Puerto Rico
    6. South Australia's Blackout Explained (and no, Renewables aren't to Blame)

      South Australia's Blackout Explained (and no, Renewables aren't to Blame)

      On Wednesday, something very unusual happened: the entire state of South Australia lost power. Known as a “system black,” it’s something the Australian Energy Market Operator (Aemo) had only prepared for in theory – never having the unfortunate opportunity to put “black start” procedures into place.What caused the blackout? The cause was very clear. And it was not due to renewable energy. One of the worst storms to hit South Australia in 50 years knocked out 22 high-voltage power pylons. The lines on those pylons carry electricity generated near Port Augusta to the rest of the state.

      Read Full Article
      Mentions: Australia
    7. A Texas Startup's Big Energy Idea: Storing Electricity Underground

      A Texas Startup's Big Energy Idea: Storing Electricity Underground

      In a field in Central Texas, Aaron Mandell and his crew are running pumping equipment to bring a former oil and gas well back to life. But they’re not trying to extract black gold. Instead, they are developing a way to turn abandoned oil and gas wells into vaults for storing electricity. The concept behind Mandell’s startup, Quidnet Energy, sounds simple: pumping water deep into the earth to fill up the cracks in-between rocks that previously held fossil fuels. When the pressurized water is released, it acts like a spring as it races through a turbine-generator above ground, powering it to produce electricity.

      Read Full Article
      Mentions: CA NV OR
    8. Greens' Want 1.2m Households to Install Renewable Energy Storage

      Greens' Want 1.2m Households to Install Renewable Energy Storage

      The Greens want millions of households to install renewable energy storage units, saying battery storage could “revolutionise” Australia’s energy system. They have announced a five-year support package for 1.2m homes and 30,000 businesses, to encourage the take-up of solar storage across Australia.The Greens say the program - estimated to cost $2.9b - could be funded by scrapping concessions to fossil fuel-intensive industries, and are promising to make the policy central to their post-budget and post-election negotiations with the Coalition and Labor.

      Read Full Article
      Mentions: Australia
    9. Improved Energy Storage Could Help Save Britain £8bn a Year, Says Report

      Improved Energy Storage Could Help Save Britain £8bn a Year, Says Report

      Britain could save £8bn a year and slash its carbon footprint by using electricity better, a new report says. The National Infrastructure Commission said a “smart power revolution” which improves the storage of power could transform the energy landscape. Its report, Smart Power, looks into ways the UK can better balance supply and demand in the energy market. It said Britain should connect more of its network to mainland Europe and store energy better. This would save consumers up to £8bn a year by 2030, help meet the UK’s 2050 carbon targets, and secure Britain’s energy supply for generations, the report finds.

      Read Full Article
      Mentions: Europe UK
    10. From Liquid Air to Supercapacitors, Energy Storage is Finally Poised for a Breakthrough

      From Liquid Air to Supercapacitors, Energy Storage is Finally Poised for a Breakthrough

      It doesn’t always rain when you need water, so we have reservoirs - but we don’t have the same system for electricity,” says Jill Cainey, director of the UK’s Electricity Storage Network. But that may change in 2016, with industry figures predicting a breakthrough year for a technology not only seen as vital to the large-scale rollout of renewable energy, but also offering the prospect of lowering customers’ energy bills. Big batteries, whose costs are plunging, are leading the way. But a host of other technologies, from existing schemes like splitting water to create hydrogen, compressing air in underground caverns, flywheels and heated gravel pits, to longer term bets like supercapacitors and superconducting magnets, are also jostling for position.

      Read Full Article
      Mentions: CA DoE Europe
    1-13 of 13
  1. Categories

    1. Electricity Source:

      Solar Photovoltaic, Wave, Tidal, Hydro, Wind
    2. Storage Market:

      Commercial & Industrial, Military, Residential & Community & Microgrid, Smart Grid, Utility Grid, Vehicle-to-Grid/Home
    3. Storage Technology:

      Compressed Air/Gas, Flow Battery, Flywheel, Hydrogen, Lead, Liquid Metal, Lithium, Magnesium, Mechanical Storage, Nickel, Sodium, Supercapacitors, Vanadium, Zinc
    4. Article Types:

      Null, Reports and Conferences