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    1. During Irma’s Power Outages, Some Houses Kept The Lights On With Solar And Batteries

      During Irma’s Power Outages, Some Houses Kept The Lights On With Solar And Batteries

      When Hurricane Irma blew out a transformer on his block in Orlando on the night of September 10, Andy Green–like most of the people on his street, and millions of people throughout Florida–lost power from the grid. But Green, who installed Tesla’s Powerwall home battery storage in early August, kept his lights on. “We didn’t have full power–we couldn’t have the whole house running–but we cut it down to the bare minimum, like air conditioning, refrigeration, internet, that sort of thing,” says Green. Though power is still out in parts of Orlando, electricity on his block came back from the grid 21 hours later. While it was off, Green’s Powerwall, connected to the solar panels on his roof, kept going. When the clouds parted the next day, the battery started recharging.

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      Mentions: FL Tesla
    2. This Battery Company Wants To Challenge Tesla In The Energy Storage Industry

      This Battery Company Wants To Challenge Tesla In The Energy Storage Industry

      Electric vehicles are still just a glimmer at the edge of the automobile market: They make up less than 1% of all cars sold in the U.S. But fast forward to the year 2040, and they’re expected to dominate–a report from Bloomberg New Energy Finance estimates they’ll account for 54% of sales in just three decades. This rapid growth, though, begs a question: Where are the batteries going to come from?

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      Mentions: France NV U.S.
    3. Large-Scale Energy Storage Is The (Virtual) Power Plant Of The Future

      Large-Scale Energy Storage Is The (Virtual) Power Plant Of The Future

      When utilities worry about meeting energy demand, they normally build more power plants and distribution networks. But when New York City’s utility, Con Edison, projected a power shortfall in the Brooklyn-Queens network back in 2014, it decided to take another tack. Con Ed organized an auction for “demand response capacity” and awarded contracts to a variety of energy storage and efficiency startups. It reasoned that, if it could cut the amount of power high-users were taking off at certain times of the day, it could reduce the need to build out the network. Grids are typically designed with massive inefficiencies. 

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      Mentions: NY
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