1. 1-17 of 17
    1. Halide Salts Make Lithium Batteries More Durable

      Halide Salts Make Lithium Batteries More Durable

      Chemical engineers at Cornell University used halide salts to create safer, longer-lasting lithium batteries. Adding certain halide salts to liquid electrolytes spontaneously creates nanostructured surface coatings on a lithium battery anode that hinder the development of detrimental dendritic structures that grow within the battery cell. The discovery opens the way potentially to extend the daily cycle life of a rechargeable lithium battery by up to a factor of 10.

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      Mentions: EIA
    2. Nanotubular Material Could Be Used for Energy Storage

      Nanotubular Material Could Be Used for Energy Storage

      Scientists at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California have created a new material that is 10 times stronger and stiffer than traditional aerogels of the same density. This ultralow-density, ultrahigh surface area bulk material with an interconnected nanotubular makeup could be used in catalysis, energy storage and conversion, thermal insulation, shock energy absorption and high energy density physics.

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      Mentions: California EIA
    3. Model Predicts Carbon Components’ Performance as Electrodes

      Model Predicts Carbon Components’ Performance as Electrodes

      Researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Rice University have created a theoretical model that predicts how carbon components will perform as anodes in lithium-ion batteries. The model is based on intrinsic electronic characteristics of materials used as battery anodes. These include the material’s quantum capacitance (the ability of the material to absorb charge) and the material’s absolute Fermi level, which determines how many lithium ions may bond to the electrodes.

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    4. Technique Produces Next-Gen Electrodes for Li-Ion Batteries

      Technique Produces Next-Gen Electrodes for Li-Ion Batteries

      Scientists at the University of Tokyo have developed an approach with industrial potential to produce nano-sized composite silicon-based powders as negative electrodes for the next generation lithium ion batteries. The lithium-ion battery market has been growing steadily and has been seeking an approach to increase battery capacity while retaining its capacity for long recharging process.

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    5. Researchers Create Sand-Based Li-Ion Batteries

      Researchers Create Sand-Based Li-Ion Batteries

      Researchers at the University of California, Riverside, have developed an inexpensive way to produce sand-based Li-ion batteries. “This is the holy grail—a low cost, non-toxic, environmentally friendly way to produce high performance lithium ion battery anodes,” said Zachary Favors, a graduate student working with Cengiz and Mihri Ozkan, both engineering professors at UC Riverside. The idea came to Favors six months ago. He was relaxing on the beach after surfing in San Clemente, Calif. when he picked up some sand, took a close look at it and saw it was made up primarily of quartz, or silicon dioxide.

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      Mentions: U.S.
    6. New Electrochemistry Tech Makes Batteries Last Longer

      New Electrochemistry Tech Makes Batteries Last Longer

      Scientists at the University of Alberta have used a process called induced fluorination to create faster-charging, longer-lasting batteries. “What we’ve done is develop a new electrochemistry technology that can provide high energy density and high power density for the next generation,” said lead researcher Xinwei Cui, who completed his PhD in materials engineering at the University of Alberta in 2010 and is now chief technology officer at AdvEn Solutions, a technology development company that is working on the battery so it can be commercially manufactured for use in electronic devices.

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      Mentions: Alberta
    7. Nanotechnology Enables Storing Energy in Copper Wire

      Nanotechnology Enables Storing Energy in Copper Wire

      Scientists at the University of Central Florida have created a novel device architecture of a coaxial supercapacitor cable that functions both as electrical cable and energy storage device. Nanotechnology scientist and professor Jayan Thomas and his Ph.D. student Zenan Yu have developed a way to both transmit and store electricity in a single lightweight copper wire. Their work is the focus of the cover story of the June 30 issue of the material science journal Advanced Materials (see footnote) and Nature has published a detailed discussion about this technology in the current issue.

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      Mentions: Florida
    8. Scientists Examine New Material With Potential Use in Batteries

      Scientists Examine New Material With Potential Use in Batteries

      Analysis of a manganese-based crystal by scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has produced the first clear picture of its molecular structure. The findings could help explain the magnetic and electronic behavior of the whole family of crystals, many of which have potential for use in batteries.

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    9. New Material Makes Li-Ion Batteries Last 3 Times Longer

      New Material Makes Li-Ion Batteries Last 3 Times Longer

      A group of researchers at the University of California, Riverside Bourns College of Engineering have developed a new way to make lithium-ion batteries that will last three times longer between charges compared to the current industry standard. The team created silicon dioxide (SiO2) nanotube anodes for lithium-ion batteries and found they had over three times as much energy storage capacity as the carbon-based anodes currently being used. This has significant implications for industries including electronics and electric vehicles, which are always trying to squeeze longer discharges out of batteries.

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    10. Study Examines Future of Pumped Storage Systems

      Study Examines Future of Pumped Storage Systems

      A new study of Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule Aachen (RWTH Aachen University) about the future role of pumped storage power systems in Germany, commissioned by Voith Hydro, was presented in Berlin. Within the context of the energy transition, the scientists of RWTH examined the role of pumped storage power plants, i. e. large power stores, for two scenarios: one for the year 2030 with a 60% share of renewable energies in power generation, and one for the year 2050 with a share of 80%.

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      Mentions: Germany
    11. Toshiba to Demonstrate Grid-Scale Battery Energy Storage on Remote Islands

      Toshiba to Demonstrate Grid-Scale Battery Energy Storage on Remote Islands

      Toshiba Corporation announced that it has delivered battery energy storage systems integrating the company’s SCiB, an innovative lithium-ion secondary battery to Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc., for a demonstration project to expand introduction of renewable energy sources on remote islands. The systems have been installed in substations on Tanegashima Island and Amamioshima Island, in Kagoshima prefecture, and will be used to demonstrate the integration and optimum control of battery energy storage systems deployed to manage frequency regulation and maintain stable power supply on remote islands, which are increasingly turning to renewable energy sources. The demonstration program will run for three years to fiscal 2016.

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      Mentions: Japan Spain Colorado
    12. Energy Department's Grid Energy Storage Report Released

      Energy Department's Grid Energy Storage Report Released

      Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz yesterday released the Energy Department’s Grid Energy Storage report to the members of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee. The report was commissioned at the request of Senator Ron Wyden, Committee Chairman. The report identifies the benefits of grid energy storage, the challenges that must be addressed to enable broader use, and the efforts of the Energy Department, in conjunction with industry and other government organizations, to meet those challenges.

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      Mentions: Japan Asia DoE
    13. DTU's 2013 Energy Report: Energy Storage Key to Renewables

      DTU's 2013 Energy Report: Energy Storage Key to Renewables

      The focus of the recently released Technical University of Denmark’s (DTU) International Energy Report 2013 is energy storage. According to the report, one of the greatest challenges in the transition to a non-fossil energy system with a high share of fluctuating renewable energy sources, such as solar and wind, is to align consumption and production in an economically satisfactory manner. Energy storage technologies can store energy in the form of thermal, electrical, chemical, kinetic or potential energy and return it when needed. Example energy storage methods include subsoil heat, water pumped into high reservoirs, flywheels, batteries and fuel for the transport sector.

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    14. Large-Scale Lithium Energy Storage Facility Launched in Germany

      Large-Scale Lithium Energy Storage Facility Launched in Germany

      Evonik Industries, STEAG, and other project partners put a lithium electricity storage system (LESSY) into operation at STEAG’s Fenne power plant in Völklingen, Germany . Its purpose—to solve the problem of grid scale energy storage , thus allowing thus allowing successful integration of intermittent renewable energy sources into the nation’s power system.

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      Mentions: Germany
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