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    1. VCU Researcher Receives NSF Grant to Extend Lifespan of Li-ion Batteries

      VCU Researcher Receives NSF Grant to Extend Lifespan of Li-ion Batteries

      A Virginia Commonwealth University professor has received a five-year, $505,000 award from the National Science Foundation to make lithium-ion batteries -- which power electric vehicles and portable electronic devices -- far more efficient, sustainable and environmentally friendly. Arunkumar Subramanian, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering in the School of Engineering, will use the grant to deliver technological advances that reduce the cost and carbon footprint of Li-ion batteries by extending their lifespan. He will simultaneously research alternative battery materials that are both nontoxic and more abundant.

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    2. Nanoparticle Networks Promise Cheaper Batteries for Storing Renewable Energy

      Nanoparticle Networks Promise Cheaper Batteries for Storing Renewable Energy

      Liquids containing a flowing network of nanoscale particles could make batteries cheaper to manufacture, and thereby reduce the cost of using large amounts of solar and wind power. Conventional batteries are far too expensive to store hours of electricity from large solar power plants or wind farms for use when the sun isn’t shining or the wind isn’t blowing. But the networked nanoparticles could enable a cheaper new type of battery called a flow battery.  Today, the total amount of wind and solar power is small, and existing fossil fuel plants can make up for any shortfalls. But renewable energy is growing quickly, especially in places such as California, and existing infrastructure might not be enough to support them and keep the lights on. Batteries are cleaner than fossil fuel plants, and can also respond to changes in the sun and wind far faster than fossil fuel plants can.

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    3. Saft receives 5 Star award from Raytheon (Target Acquisition System)

      Saft receives 5 Star award from Raytheon (Target Acquisition System)
      Since 2004, Saft has supplied batteries for Raytheon’s Improved Target Acquisition System (ITAS). Saft’s 28V lithium battery powers the surveillance, target acquisition and fire control system for the U.S. Army’s TOW missile. Saft’s Li-ion batteries were selected because they provide a longer lifetime and have a lower life cycle cost than other chemistries.
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