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    1. New Water-Based Battery Offers Large-Scale Energy Storage

      New Water-Based Battery Offers Large-Scale Energy Storage

      Stanford researchers have developed a water-based battery that could provide a cheap way to store wind or solar energy generated when the sun is shining and wind is blowing so it can be fed back into the electric grid and be redistributed when demand is high. The prototype manganese-hydrogen battery, reported April 30 in Nature Energy, stands just three inches tall and generates a mere 20 milliwatt hours of electricity, which is on par with the energy levels of LED flashlights that hang on a key ring. Despite the prototype’s diminutive output, the researchers are confident they can scale up this table-top technology to an industrial-grade system that could charge and recharge up to 10,000 times, creating a grid-scale battery with a useful lifespan well in excess of a decade.

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      Mentions: DoE U.S. Stanford
    2. New Stanford Energy System Cuts Greenhouse Gas Emissions 68 Percent and Fossil Fuel 65 Percent

      New Stanford Energy System Cuts Greenhouse Gas Emissions 68 Percent and Fossil Fuel 65 Percent

      Stanford announces an innovative new approach to meeting its energy needs that will make it one of the world's most energy-efficient universities. The comprehensive new system incorporates solar power for electricity, combined with heat recovery, to allow the university to exceed the aggressive greenhouse gas emissions reduction goals of California's landmark AB 32 Global Warming Solutions Act.

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      Mentions: CA U.S. Europe
    3. Stanford's GCEP Awards $10.5 Million for Research on Renewable Energy

      Stanford's GCEP Awards $10.5 Million for Research on Renewable Energy

      The Global Climate and Energy Project (GCEP) at Stanford University has awarded $10.5 million for seven research projects designed to advance a broad range of renewable energy technologies. The funding will be shared by six Stanford research teams and an international group from the United States and Europe. "The seven projects funded by GCEP could spark discoveries that lead to dramatic improvements in energy storage, solar cells and renewable biofuels," said GCEP Director Sally Benson, a professor of energy resources engineering at Stanford.

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      Mentions: U.S. Europe Stanford
    4. Stanford study: grid-scale batteries are efficient for PV but not for wind

      Stanford study: grid-scale batteries are efficient for PV but not for wind

      "Using batteries to store solar power during periods of low demand would ... be energetically favorable," the scientists said. The results were quite different for wind farms ... storing surplus wind-generated electricity in batteries results in even greater ROI reductions – from about 20% for lithium-ion batteries to more than 50% for lead-acid.

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      Mentions: Stanford
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