1. Articles in category: Liquid Metal

    1-24 of 67 1 2 3 »
    1. Ambri Returns to The Energy Storage Hunt With Liquid Metal Battery Redesign

      Ambri Returns to The Energy Storage Hunt With Liquid Metal Battery Redesign

      Ambri, with its liquid metal battery technology, has returned to the energy storage race after "a pause" in which it redesigned its high-temperature seals and worked on other facets of its storage system. Getting an entirely new and novel battery chemistry to commercial scale is Sisyphean work. About a year ago, the firm had to lay off approximately 25 percent of its staff because the startup had "not made the technology progress [it] had anticipated." The CEO said at the time, "Bringing new scientific discoveries in the physical sciences to commercial success is hard; the process is not entirely knowable or amenable to predictable timelines." The firm had been working on prototype storage systems with project partners such as Hawaiian Electric and Con Edison.

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      Mentions: France MIT Stanford
    2. The Battery of the Future

      The Battery of the Future

      Batteries have the potential to more efficiently power our portable devices, fuel our vehicles, and disrupt the way the electric grid works. But advances in battery technology have been slow to respond to the power demands of modern life. Moore's Law sees computer chips double in performance and drop their price by 50 percent every 18 to 24 months.  But batteries adhere to much slower experience curves that typically see them double in performance perhaps every ten years. The stubborn refusal of battery materials to yield in price and size explains the high cost of electric vehicles and grid storage.

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      Mentions: IBM MIT A123
    3. Bigger Than Batteries: Why the Cost of Other Components Matters to Storage Deployment

      Bigger Than Batteries: Why the Cost of Other Components Matters to Storage Deployment

      When it comes to energy storage systems, the cost of the battery itself receives a great deal of attention, but a new report shows that the plummeting price of other storage components could prove just as significant for the proliferation of the resource. The 15 to 20 different items in the balance of the system (BOS) represent one-half to three-fourths of the installation’s cost. Those costs are likely to plummet over the next five years – if the growth of storage deployment continues.

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      Mentions: CA DoE U.S.
    4. Nail in Nuclear's Coffin: California Turns to Batteries to Beat "Peak Load"

      Nail in Nuclear's Coffin: California Turns to Batteries to Beat "Peak Load"

      Southern California Edison is embracing energy-storage technology over the natural gas-fired peaker plants that utilities have traditionally relied upon to meet sudden shortfalls in electricity.  “If the requirement is just, ‘Hey we’re just short energy or capacity,’ then yes, energy storage is going to be the solution before probably a peaker,” Colin Cushnie, vice president of energy procurement and management, said in an interview at the utility’s office in Rosemead, California. “We don’t want to put peakers on the grid if cleaner-cost options are available.”

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    5. How Can We Store More Energy From the Sun and the Wind?

      How Can We Store More Energy From the Sun and the Wind?

      Storage methods currently being used around the world include batteries, flywheels, geothermal plants, compressed air and hydrogen - even ice. But the the most popular method is hydro power - water pumped to the top of a mountain and then released to power turbines at the bottom. According to research company Navigant, global energy storage capacity is going to rise from about 1,750 megawatts (MW) in 2016 to nearly 11,000 MW by 2020.

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      Mentions: NV IBM ESA
    6. How Energy Storage Can Cut Peaker-Plant Carbon for the Clean Power Plan

      How Energy Storage Can Cut Peaker-Plant Carbon for the Clean Power Plan

      The Clean Power Plan cites energy storage as an enabling technology, one that could help utilities and grid operators store, shift and smooth the increasing amounts of intermittent wind and solar that will be needed to meet the Obama administration’s ambitious greenhouse-gas reduction goals. But AES Energy Storage says grid-scale batteries don’t need to wait for that green power revolution to start contributing to carbon-cutting. There’s a big, fat target on the grid already -- simple-cycle natural gas “peaker” plants that exist only to serve the grid’s brief moments of peak demand.

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    7. Lithium-Ion Is the New Silicon

      Lithium-Ion Is the New Silicon

      Energy storage as an industry is no longer a curiosity or mere academic pursuit. With its ability to support the weaknesses of intermittent resources such as wind and solar, low-cost storage is the catalyst to a carbon-free world. But there are doubters who claim costs can’t drop without deep science and huge breakthroughs. For those doubters, let’s take a trip down the memory lane of a similar disruption we just witnessed in the solar industry.

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      Mentions: U.S. China MA
    8. Three Technologies that will Keep Energy Costs in Check

      Three Technologies that will Keep Energy Costs in Check

      Utilities rely on “peaker plants” during these record-setting heat waves to avoid blackouts. Such plants are more expensive and often more polluting to operate, and utilities pass the higher costs straight on to their customers. Fortunately, this energy equation is changing. Innovative pricing and smart energy systems are gradually taking hold across the United States, already allowing homes and businesses to save energy and cut costs.

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      Mentions: CA U.S. TX
    9. Hawaii, Scotland Present Energy Storage Approaches for Australia

      Hawaii, Scotland Present Energy Storage Approaches for Australia

      Energy storage is on course to see a boom similar to that in the solar market; Australia aims to tap this potential to facilitate the further roll out of renewables. A new study has identified key investment areas, and barriers, to storage implementation. An overview of the global storage market sees Hawaii and Scotland presenting viable approaches to implementation, although California and Germany are said to have the most "thorough" storage programs.

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      Mentions: CA Australia Japan
    10. Welcome to the Revolution of Low Cost Batteries and Software

      Welcome to the Revolution of Low Cost Batteries and Software

      Like Tesla before them, many of the startups building software, data analytics, user interfaces, visualization and simulation tools, and plug-and-play electronic product designs, on top of low-cost, lithium-ion batteries are coming out of Silicon Valley and backed by venture capitalists. These include Stem, Greensmith Energy, Green Charge Networks, GELI, Advanced Microgrid Solutions, Coda Energy and Sonnenbatterie.

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      Mentions: CA NV HI
    11. How Young Companies are Challenging Fossil Fuels with Solar, Wind Energy to Build Better Batteries

      How Young Companies are Challenging Fossil Fuels with Solar, Wind Energy to Build Better Batteries

      Storing this energy when the sun isn't shining or a breeze isn't blowing has remained an expensive hurdle. Battery believers say that's changing. They've invested more than $5 billion in the past decade, racing to get technologies to market. They're betting new batteries can hold enough clean energy to run a car, home, or campus; store power from wind or solar farms; and make dirty electricity grids greener by replacing generators and reducing the need for more fossil fuel plants. This market for storage capacity will increase almost 10-fold in three years to 2,400 mw, equal to six natural gas turbines, Navigant Consulting says.

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      Mentions: CA NV HI
    12. A Historical Tour of the Clean Energy Future

      A Historical Tour of the Clean Energy Future

      ARPA-E started in 2009 with a budget of $400 million, about one third of what its intellectual predecessor, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) got for its start in 1962. With ambitions to instigate a second industrial revolution, the agency received proposals for some 3,700 would-be world-changing energy technologies and handed out $151 million to 37 of them, ranging from turning water and CO2 into fuel with nothing but sunlight to better batteries. The largest single award, for $9.1 million, went to Foro Energy to help develop laser drilling that could make it cheaper to tap Earth's heat to generate electricity.

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      Mentions: CA DoE India
    13. The Zinc-Polyiodide Redox Flow Battery

      The Zinc-Polyiodide Redox Flow Battery

      A new type of redox flow battery has an energy density approaching that of lithium-ion batteries used in portable electronic devices and some small electric cars. A new zinc-polyiodide redox flow battery developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and described in Nature Communications uses an electrolyte with more than double the energy density of the next best design; opening up possibilities of using flow batteries in applications such as vehicles in the future.

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      Mentions: DoE PNNL
    14. UAF, Industry Partner to Test Battery Technology for Rural Power

      UAF, Industry Partner to Test Battery Technology for Rural Power

      The UAF and industry partner Ambri will collaborate on a project to demonstrate a new battery technology that could lower consumer electric prices in rural Alaska. The $1.5 million project, funded by a $749,000 grant from the Alaska Energy Authority and a match by Ambri and the UAF Alaska Center for Energy and Power, will use a liquid metal battery developed by Ambri. The battery could ultimately provide needed energy storage and increased system reliability, enabling communities to shift away from diesel fuel and toward renewable resources such as wind and solar for power generation.

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      Mentions: U.S. Ambri Alaska
    15. ACT Could Take More Electricity from Renewables with Liquid Metal Batteries Invented by MIT Professor Donald Sadoway

      ACT Could Take More Electricity from Renewables with Liquid Metal Batteries Invented by MIT Professor Donald Sadoway

      Even when the ACT reaches its 90 per cent renewable energy target it will still need coal or gas powered electricity at times when there isn't enough sun or wind. But storing power from renewables in grid-scale batteries could revolutionise the way we access electricity. The co-inventor of the liquid metal battery, MIT materials chemistry Professor Donald Sadoway believes the low-cost, long-life cells could be a world-changing alternative to solid state lithium-ion batteries and the ACT would be one place that could benefit. Professor Sadoway's company Ambri is about to deploy its first commercial batteries in late 2015 early 2016 at several US sites.

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      Mentions: Australia MIT Ambri
    16. New Battery May Give Grid a Boost

      New Battery May Give Grid a Boost

      It might be impossible to catch lightning in a bottle. But an MIT materials science professor, Don Sadoway, has figured out a way to pack it in a box not much bigger than a washing machine. After years of lab work at the Cambridge company that’s now known as Ambri Inc., Sadoway’s liquid-metal batteries will be connected to the electric grid in 2015 for the first time. Affordable, efficient power storage is a long-sought Holy Grail for the utility industry. The grid-scale batteries currently available use the same technology that is in laptops and cellphones and are considered impractical for widescale use, in part because they break down over time.

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      Mentions: France HI Africa
    17. The Top 10 Energy Storage Stories of 2014

      The Top 10 Energy Storage Stories of 2014

      There’s no doubt that 2014 was a breakout year for grid energy storage -- and if the industry plays its cards right, it could lay the groundwork for a lot more breakout years to come. Over the past twelve months, we’ve seen the creation of some of the first utility contracts for distributed, behind-the-meter battery deployments at a mass scale, many of them linked with rooftop solar. Prices for lithium-ion batteries keep falling, and new technologies are coming in to fill the gaps. And despite some well-publicized flameouts, the industry is moving past pilot stage and making a play for full-scale commercialization.

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      Mentions: CA Japan NV
    18. MIT team Improves Liquid Metal Batteries for Grid-Scale Storage; Lower Operating Temperature, Cost

      MIT team Improves Liquid Metal Batteries for Grid-Scale Storage; Lower Operating Temperature, Cost

      Researchers at MIT have improved a proposed liquid battery system that could enable renewable energy sources to compete with conventional power plants. Professor Donald Sadoway and colleagues have already started a company, Ambri (initially Liquid Metal Battery Corporation), to produce electrical-grid-scale liquid batteries, which comprise layers of molten material which automatically separate due to their differing densities.

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      Mentions: DoE France MIT
    19. Liquid Metal Alloy Electrode Boosts Potential of Sodium-Beta Batteries

      Liquid Metal Alloy Electrode Boosts Potential of Sodium-Beta Batteries

      A new battery electrode designed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) combines liquid-state cesium and sodium to dramatically improve on the efficiency, safety and useful life of sodium-beta batteries (NBBs). If the technology is scaled up successfully, the advance could help build a smart electric grid that makes better use of renewables, such as solar and wind.

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      Mentions: Japan Europe PNNL
    20. Iron-Chromium Flow Battery Aims to Replace Gas Plants

      Iron-Chromium Flow Battery Aims to Replace Gas Plants

      The four round structures pictured above may look like grain silos but they're actually giant flow batteries. They're part of a demonstration plant going online this week, and proponents say it could represent the future of long-duration energy storage on the electric grid. Startup EnerVault will unveil tomorrow what it says is the largest iron-chromium flow battery ever made. Installed in Turlock, Calif., the four-hour, 250-kilowatt battery will be charged by a solar array and power an irrigation system. The project was funded by about US $5 million from Department of Energy through the stimulus program and the California Energy Commission.

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      Mentions: CA DoE CA Energy Comm
    21. Ambri Funding Influx Suggests a New Day for Grid Batteries

      Ambri Funding Influx Suggests a New Day for Grid Batteries

      Progress being made by battery startup Ambri suggests that the market for long-duration grid energy storage is finally taking shape. Storing wind and solar power using today’s battery technologies is too expensive, but new technologies could make it affordable, enabling wider use of renewables. The Cambridge, Massachusetts, company this week said it has raised a $35 million series-C round to fund the production of prototype batteries from an existing factory and finance construction of a commercial-scale plant. The company intends to test prototypes in the field this year and produce full-size batteries for paying customers by 2016.

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      Mentions: CA HI MA
    1-24 of 67 1 2 3 »
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