1. Batteries Perform Many Different Functions on the Power Grid

    Batteries Perform Many Different Functions on the Power Grid

    Driven largely by installations over the past three years, the electric power industry has installed about 700 megawatts (MW) of utility-scale batteries on the U.S. electric grid. As of October 2017, these batteries made up about 0.06% of U.S. utility-scale generating capacity. Another 22 MW of batteries are planned for the last two months of 2017, with 69 MW more planned for 2018. New energy storage information available in the 2016 edition of EIA’s Annual Electric Generator Report provides more detail on battery capacity, charge and discharge rates, storage technology types, reactive power ratings, storage enclosure types, and expected usage applications. Batteries, like other energy storage technologies, can serve as both energy suppliers and consumers at different times, creating an unusual combination of cost and revenue streams and making direct comparisons to other generation technologies challenging.

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