1. Energy Storage for Renewables can be a Good Investment Today, Study Finds

    Energy Storage for Renewables can be a Good Investment Today, Study Finds

    Utility companies or others planning to install renewable energy systems such as solar and wind farms have to decide whether to include large-scale energy storage systems that can capture power when it’s available and release it on demand. This decision may be critical to the future growth of renewable energy. The choices can be complicated: Would such a system actually pay for itself through increased revenues? If so, which kind of system makes the most sense, and which features of the system are most important? If not, how much cheaper do storage technologies need to be?

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  1. Quotes

    1. This means that these results can be used to inform investments in storage technology development by the private sector and government, and can inform engineering efforts in the lab.
    2. Since storage involves both energy and power characteristics, among others, improving these technologies involves targeting multiple criteria. If a utility, researcher, or technology investor were considering which research directions would be most likely to increase the value of storage, this method would be a great place to start.
    3. A strength of the study is the extensive sensitivity analysis. It takes several factors into account and then uses alternative assumptions for each factor to see if that changes the results.
  2. Topics Mentioned

  3. Categories

    1. Electricity Source:

      Solar Photovoltaic, Wave, Tidal, Hydro, Wind
    2. Storage Market:

      Commercial & Industrial, Microgrid & Community, Military, Residential, Smart Grid, Utility Grid, Vehicle-to-Grid/Home
    3. Storage Technology:

      Compressed Air/Gas, Flow Battery, Flywheel, Hydrogen, Lead, Liquid Metal, Lithium, Magnesium, Mechanical Storage, Nickel, Pumped Hydro, Sodium, Supercapacitors, Thermal, Vanadium, Zinc
    4. Article Types:

      Null, Reports and Conferences